Married women Lincoln

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Jump to . Without apologizing for being egotistical, I shall make the history of so much of my life as has elapsed since I saw you the subject of this letter. And, by the way, I now discover that in order to give a full and intelligible of the things I have done and suffered since I saw you, I shall necessarily have to relate some that happened before. It was, then, in the autumn of that a married lady of my acquaintance, and who was a great friend of mine, being about to pay a visit to her father and other relatives residing in Kentucky, proposed to me that on her return, she would bring a sister of hers with her, on condition that I would engage to become her brother-in-law with all convenient dispatch.

I, of course, accepted the proposal, for you know I could not have done otherwise had I really been averse to it; but privately, between you and me, I was most confoundedly well pleased with the project.

I had seen the said sister some three years before, thought her intelligent and agreeable, and saw no good objection to plodding life through hand in hand with her. Time passed on, the lady took her journey, and in due time returned, sister in company, sure enough. This astonished me a little, for it appeared to me that her coming so readily showed that she was a trifle too willing, but on reflection it occurred to me that she might have been prevailed on by her married sister to come, without anything concerning me ever having been mentioned to her, and so I concluded that if no other objection presented itself, I would consent to waive this.

All this occurred to me on hearing of her arrival in the neighborhood—for, be it remembered, I had not yet seen her, except about three years , as above mentioned. In a few days we had an interview, and although I had seen her before, she did not look as my imagination had pictured her.

I knew she was oversize, but she now appeared a fair match for Falstaff. And, in short, I was not at all pleased with her. But what could I do? I had told her sister that I would take her for better or for worse, and I made a point of honor and conscience in all things to stick to my word, especially if others had been induced to act on it, which in this case I had no doubt they had, for I was now fairly convinced that no other man on earth would have her, and hence the conclusion that they were bent on holding me to my bargain. I tried to imagine her handsome, which, but for her unfortunate corpulency, was actually true.

Exclusive of this, no woman that I have ever seen has a finer face. I also tried to convince myself that the mind was much more to be valued than the person, and in this she was not inferior, as I could discover, to any with whom I had been acquainted.

Jokes are grievances. Shortly after this, without attempting to come to any positive understanding with her, I set out for Vandalia, when and where you first saw me. During my stay there I had letters from her which did not change my opinion of either her intellect or intention but, on the contrary, confirmed it in both.

Through life I have been in no bondage, either real or imaginary, from the thralldom of which I so much desired to be free. After my return home I saw nothing to change my opinion of her in any particular. She was the same, and so was I. I now spent my time in planning how I might get along in life after my contemplated change of circumstances should have taken place, and how I might procrastinate the evil day for a time, which I really dreaded as much, perhaps more, than an Irishman does the halter. As the lawyer says, it was done in the manner following, to wit: after I had delayed the matter as long as I thought I could in honor do which, by the way, had brought me round into the last fall , I concluded I might as well bring it to a consummation without further delay, and so I mustered my resolution and made the proposal to her direct; but, shocking to relate, she answered, No.

At first I supposed she did it through an affectation of modesty, which I thought but ill became her under the peculiar circumstances of her case, but on my renewal of the charge I found she repelled it with greater firmness than before. I tried it again and again, but with the same success, or rather with the same want of success. Naples National Archaeological Museum, Italy. I finally was forced to give it up, at which I very unexpectedly found myself mortified almost beyond endurance.

I was mortified, it seemed to me, in a hundred different ways. My vanity was deeply wounded by the reflection that I had so long been too stupid to discover her intentions, and at the same time never doubting that I understood them perfectly—and also that she, whom I had taught myself to believe nobody else would have, had actually rejected me with all my fancied greatness.

And, to cap the whole, I then for the first time began to suspect that I was really a little in love with her. But let it all go! Others have been made fools of by the girls, but this can never with truth be said of me. I most emphatically, in this instance, made a fool of myself. I have now come to the conclusion never again to think of marrying, and for this reason—I can never be satisfied with anyone who would be blockhead enough to have me.

When you receive this, write me a long yarn about something to amuse me. Give my respects to Mr. From a letter to Mrs. Browning asked the president if she could share the letter with a biographer, he denied permission because it contained too much truth. Dear Madam, Without apologizing for being egotistical, I shall make the history of so much of my life as has elapsed since I saw you the subject of this letter. Contributor Abraham Lincoln.

Related Re. Essay States of Mind. Voices In Time. From the Archives.

Married women Lincoln

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Abraham Lincoln Loses the Girl